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The Top 10 Places Where You Can Get PR For Your Music and How To Tackle It (Part One)

by Randy Chertkow and Jason Feehan
02/14/2017

File Under: Getting Media Attention & PR, Networking and Your Team

Last week we discussed the difference between marketing and PR and discovered PR doesn't need to cost anything, and simply takes a little time and effort. So, to help you publicize your latest release, show, or event, for $0, we've created a list of 10 media outlets you should target. 

Before you go after these outlets, we've outlined the prep steps you should take care of before you tackle PR to increase the likelihood of getting your music covered. Otherwise, your PR campaigns will be haphazard and unfocused. 

 
 
 

To prepare yourself for targeting particular media outlets, first create a media list spreadsheet so you know who exactly to target. This should contain the following:

  1. Add Media Outlets That Have Covered You Before
    Add the name of any journalist, blogger, podcaster, YouTuber, or media outlet that's publicized you before. The name of the outlet is important, but even more critical is the name of the person. This is a key thing you should track since anyone who's publicized you in the past is more likely to do so in the future. This is why you need to pull together every bit of media coverage you've received. You'll be using some of the quotes from this in your communications to these media outlets.

  2. Add Media Outlets That Have Covered Similar Artists Like You
    Add anyone who's covered artists that sound similar to you. Do a web search to see which publications, blogs, and any of The DIY Advisor's 28 Categories of Places to Get Your Music Heard such as streaming stations, MP3 Blogs, podcasts, etc where they've been covered.

  3. Add or Note Any Media Outlets You or Your Team and Network is Connected To
    Lastly, go through your media list and see if you're connected to any people at the outlets you listed. Check with your bandmates, your team (friends, family), your fans, and anyone else in your network to see who they might know. And, if you use it, don't forget LinkedIn, which will show you if you have any direct connections. Once you have this, ask them to introduce you to get covered through a "warm hand-off".

Then, to prepare for a broader campaign, designate someone to be in charge of PR. You can do it, but as we've said numerous times, building your music business takes a team approach. After all, someone has to focus on creating the music.

Once you've got the initial prep work out of the way, the last step is to research the media outlets that will cover your music. Tune in next week and we'll share the 10 media outlets you should research and target. Plus, we'll give some additional advice on running your PR campaign.

This Week's Challenge: Create a media list spreadsheet for your music. Try using a free spreadsheet like Google Sheets or Microsoft Excel Online to get started.

Related:

#getheard #getPR #PR #media

Photo credit: stevebustin


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