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Web Clips for August 2006

7/17/2006

Looking for web clips from a different issue of Electronic Musician magazine? You can find an archive of web clips from previous issues of EM magazine here.
FROM THE EM ARCHIVES
DIY: BUILD THE EM THEREMIN
February 1996

By Robert Moog
EM Editor in Chief Steve Oppenheimer worked with Bob Moog to develop this article; it took almost a year, but when it was done, they had a classic story. Read it here.
1.1MB screen optimized pdf
11MB print optimized pdf

DOWNLOAD OF THE MONTH
Andreas Ersson Virtual Instruments (Win)
Web Clip 1
This clip uses all six Andreas Ersson plug-ins. The drum synths are layered, with Vendetta responsible for the sound effects. Iblit lays the bass, PolyIblit covers the changes, and LazySnake takes the lead.

ALESIS FUSION
Web Clip 1:
Here's a Fusion Mix that showcases a right-hand improvisation over the arpeggiator rhythm of Phod.
Web Clip 2:
This groove is courtesy of the Fusion's arpeggiator, a Mix called Cold Fusion.
Web Clip 3:
Square Wow Lead demonstrates what happens when you turn the filter-cutoff knob: a sudden jump to a low cutoff frequency, followed by grainy stair-stepping artifacts..
Web Clip 4:
Traveling Flute, a preset that uses the Reed physical model, sounds appropriately flutelike, but two points are worth noting: the grainy pitch bend and the fact that the octaves are out of tune.

GARRITAN STRADIVARI SOLO VIOLIN
Web Clip 1:
Here's a brief example from an original song with violin, guitar, and percussion parts. The only processing on the Stradivari Violin is reverb.
Web Clip 2:
Garritan supplied a MIDI file with two tracks; I assigned one to Stradivari Violin and the other to a synth pad, both with a little reverb. This example demonstrates legato, spiccato, tremolo, double-stop, harmonic, sordino, pizzicato, and glissando playing techniques, all enabled with keyswitching.

CAMEL AUDIO
CamelPhat 3.15 and CamelSpace 1.15
(Mac/Win)
Web Clip 1:
This is a 130 bpm groove first heard unprocessed, then in three CamelPhat-processed variations.
Web Clip 2:
This is an acoustic bass line first heard unprocessed, then in three CamelSpace-processed variations.

MAKING TRACKS
Web Clip 1:
This is the four-bar chord progression from Fig. 2 of the article. It contains the same chords in close-inversion followed by open-inversion voicings. The open-inversion voicings sound much more like a real string section.
Web Clip 2:
The MIDI clip from Fig. 3 of the article realized with the MOTU Symphony Instrument sample library.
Web Clip 3:
The MIDI clip from Fig. 3 of the article realized with a Mach Five version of the Vienna Strings sample library.
Web Clip 4:
The MIDI clip from Fig. 3 of the article realized with the IK Multimedia version of the Miroslav Philharmonik sample library.

BIG FISH AUDIO
Raging Guitars 1.1.8.3
(Mac/Win)
Web Clip 1:
Rhythm guitar loops from Raging Guitars Construction Kits drive this short piece. You'll also hear a lead guitar patch and, on the fadeout, muted guitars. Drums and bass are courtesy of Steinberg Groove Agent 2 and Virtual Bassist respectively.

MAKING TRACKS
Evolving Grooves

Web Clip 1:
This example of an evolving-groove was assembled from a 4/4 loop at 140 bpm and 12 variants, all in 4/4 and at 140 bpm to ensure that the groove mix remains synced. I used the Ohm Force plug-ins Quad Frohmage Filterbank and Ohmboyz Delay to create the variants. With some variants I altered the rhythm of the original groove, mostly by using delay to double beats (quarter notes to eighths, eighths to sixteenths, and so on). Other times I modified variants' timbre using filtering, flanging, or other sound-shaping tool.

LINPLUG VIRTUAL INSTRUMENTS
Octopus 1.1
(Mac/Win)
Web Clip 1:
This three-track clip was made using Octopus presets that use Octopus's two pattern sequencers.

FIRST ACT
V-Stack Classic and Tweedy

Web Clip 1:
To come

MUSICLAB
RealGuitar 2L v
(Mac/Win)
Web Clip 1:
This example illustrates solo mode, in which the plug-in literally interprets MIDI input. Notice the random fretboard squeaks and release and pick noise along with occasional hammer-on notes and slides.
Web Clip 2:
Remarkably, Real Guitar can take my unquantized guitar strumming and create a viable performance in a completely different style. This clip takes the same MIDI strums from Web Clip 1 and generates fingerpicking patterns on a twelve-string guitar patch.
Web Clip 3:
This clip features a nylon-string guitar patch in Chord mode. Notice that the plug-in has reinterpreted my chordal input to an open a chord from the original G chord capoed up two frets. You can use a virtual capo to change chord voicing.

SOUND DESIGN WORKSHOP
Extreme Resonance

Web Clip 1:
In part 1, I chose the Ultra Analog Arp Epiano preset and held down a widely spaced C major chord (C-G-E) while turning the filter cutoff frequency up and down to vary the color. In part 2, I did the same thing with the filter resonance turned up, volume turned down, and cutoff frequency lowered.
Web Clip 2:
In part 1, I chose the Arpeg Aggressive preset and played a stacked-fifths chord (C-G-D). In part 2, I did the same thing with high resonance.
Web Clip 3:
Here I played a high-resonance variant of the Glass preset using stacked fifths. The motion is generated by random LFO control of filter cutoff.

SQUARE ONE
Operators Are Standing By

Web Clip 1:
This electric piano riff is played using Image-Line Sytrus. The Sytrus patch uses five operators: 1 and 3 are the carriers, 2 is the modulator for 1, and 4 and 5 are both modulators for 3. The sections of the audio file, in order: (a) The full five-operator patch. (b) Operator 1 by itself produces a dull sine wave. (All of the operators in this patch use sine waves.) (c) Operators 1 and 2. Notice the high, bell-like overtone produced by the modulator. (d) Operators 3 and 4. Here, the modulator produces a more full-bodied attack transient. (e) Operators 3, 4, and 5 together produce a sound that is more organ-like, because it lacks color. (f) Operators 1 and 3, both of which are carriers, are detuned from one another to produce a chorusing effect. (g) Operators 1, 2, 3, and 4 without 5 produce an interesting plucked sound. (h) The full five-operator sound again.
Web Clip 2:
These tones show what happens when the frequency of the carrier (in the first tone) and then the modulator (in the second tone) is increased from 1 to 16 times the frequency of the fundamental. Web Clips 2 through 9 were all produced using the FM4 synth in Native Instruments Reaktor.
Web Clip 3:
In this tone, the amount of signal from the modulator slowly increases and then decreases back to zero.
Web Clip 4:
In these tones, three modulators are all applied to one carrier. The first modulator (heard in all three tones) produces a plucked attack transient. The second modulator (heard in tones 2 and 3) produces some soft overtones that begin after the attack. The third modulator (heard only in tone 3) produces a lower-range overtone with a different envelope.
Web Clip 5:

Two modulators with fixed frequencies are applied to the carrier in this example. The first provides a very quick attack and the second adds a high, ringing formant.
Web Clip 6:
The carrier in this tone is set to a low fixed frequency (less than 2 Hz), which adds a rolling chorused quality.
Web Clip 7:
The modulator's envelope decays to zero during the sustain portion of the long note, revealing a high carrier frequency.
Web Clip 8:
This phrase was produced by playing a major scale up and down the keyboard. In the upper register, the tonality of the notes is obscured by aliasing, which is caused by high sidebands generated in the FM process.

SYNTHOGY
Ivory 1.5
(Mac/Win)
Web Clip 1:
Here's an excerpt from an original four-handed piano composition inspired by Mozart, played on an Ivory Program called Bosendorfer Imperial 10.

Web Clip 2:
For this recording, I opened two instances of Ivory-one track playing a reverb-drenched Program called Distant Concert 10, and the other playing a Synth Layer called Lush Pad, with no piano loaded.

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