Bias Repli-Q Plug-In: Impose one file’s audio spectrum on another

OBJECTIVE: Change the spectral response of a target file so that it matches, to a greater or lesser degree, the spectral response of a reference file.BACKGROUND: It’s possible to analyze a reference signal’s spectrum, and match a target signal’s spectrum to the reference so that their tonal qualities are similar. For example, an album might have one cut that was mixed at a different studio, and sounds out of place with other cuts; spectrum-matching can even out any differences. In this example, we’ll use Repli-Q (an Audio Units plug-in that’s part of the BIAS Master Perfection Suite as well as BIAS Peak Pro XT, but is also available separately) to apply a hip-hop drum spectrum to a rock drum loop, giving a stronger bottom and brighter highs.
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STEPS

1. Open the reference file and the target file to which you want to apply the reference.

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2. Insert Repli-Q as a plug-in.

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3. Start playback for the reference file, then click on Learn Spectrum. Click Learn Spectrum again to turn off the “learning” process, then stop playback.

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4. Click on Save Spectrum. Once saved, this spectrum can also be used for future spectral matching, and loaded from the “Load” field.

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5. Start playback for the target file, then click on Learn Spectrum. The reference file response is the yellow line, and the target file response is the green line.

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6. Click Learn Spectrum again to turn off the “learning” process. A blue line appears that shows the target file’s new spectral response. This response depends on the setting of the Matching slider (see next).

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7. Adjust the Matching slider for the desired spectral response. At 0, the target response is unchanged. At 100, the target response matches the reference response. Often, you’ll want a setting between these two extremes, where the reference “influences” the target rather than “takes it over.” Once you’ve nailed the sound you want, perform a bounce or apply the Repli-Q effect.

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TIPS

-In Steps 3, 5, and 6, it’s a good idea to loop short samples. If the program “learns” while there’s silence (e.g., if you hit Learn before initiating play), the silence will be averaged in and give a false reference.
-The Smoothing fader evens out the response a bit in case the target sounds too “peaky” or has unwanted resonances.