EM Editor's Note: You Win Some, You Lose Some - EMusician

EM Editor's Note: You Win Some, You Lose Some

This month''s Maroon 5 coverage gives me an opportunity to relate a story from back when I was editing Onstage—which, for those who don''t remember it, was a magazine for live musicians that spun off from EM in late 2000.
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This month''s Maroon 5 coverage gives me an opportunity to relate a story from back when I was editing Onstage—which, for those who don''t remember it, was a magazine for live musicians that spun off from EM in late 2000. In 2002, I received a CD from the publicist of a then-unknown band called Maroon 5, along with an invite to go hear them play a showcase set at a club in Manhattan called the Village Underground. The publicist was, of course, hoping I''d decide to run a story about Maroon 5.

I really liked the CD, so I checked out the live show. The band performed impressively in the small and packed club. But later, when the publicist pressed me to write a story about them, I balked. I just didn''t think they were well-known enough to justify giving precious page space to. I always regretted that decision because even though the album, Songs About Jane, didn''t really catch fire until 2004, it would have seemed awfully prescient to have featured them before they became superstars.

Naturally, this time around, it was a no-brainer to cover them on the occasion of the release of their third album, Hands All Over, which was produced by the legendary Mutt Lange. For the story, I interviewed Adam Levine (no relation) and Jesse Carmichael from the band, as well as Noah Passovoy, who engineered their numerous demo sessions for the album.

All three were very forthcoming and offered lots of info about the recording process. However, I was almost thwarted by a sudden power outage in my home office while I was interviewing Carmichael by phone. I was recording the interview into my DAW, and when the power went out, the recording disappeared (which reminded me how much I need to purchase an uninterruptible-power-supply unit). Fortune smiled on me this time, however, as, for the first time, I had a battery-operated stereo recorder running concurrently with my DAW—as a backup during the interview—so I was able to salvage that portion of my discussion with Carmichael. Score one for redundancy.

Another artist story in this issue that I want to spotlight is the interview with Tommy Lee in the “Inside Talk” column, where he talks about the online public collaboration that was part of the production process for his about-to-be-released Methods of Mayhem album, A Public Disservice Announcement. He posted stems on a site called thepublicrecord.com, requesting people to download the tracks and add their own parts or do remixes. He got 10,000 submissions. From those, he chose a bunch to incorporate into the songs he and his band had already recorded.

On the subject of submitting music online, did you know that there is a growing number of websites that facilitate music licensing for independent musicians? Licensing has become a important part of many musicians'' incomes these days, so you''ll want to check out “License to Earn”. In it, author Dave Tough, a Nashville-based producer, songwriter, and mixer, goes through all the major licensing sites and gives you the rundown on how they work, what they cost, and more. Enjoy the issue.