January 2010 Web Clips - EMusician

January 2010 Web Clips

January 2010 Web Clips
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p12 | Harrison Consoles Mixbus Download of the Month

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Web Clip 1: This clip is the straight playback of five stems, all normalized and panned to center.

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Web Clip 2: Here the stems from Web Clip 1 have been imported and mixed in Harrison Console Mixbus.

p13 | Soundtrack

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Bassnectar video: Here's a video interview with Lorin Ashton, aka Bassnectar, about his production techniques and gear. It also includes excerpts from two of his songs, and his comments on how he produced them.

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Fat Freddy's Drop: This is an excerpt from "The Nod" off Dr. Boondigga & the Big BW (The Drop, 2009), in which you can hear the synth and horn parts working together.

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Now vs. Now: Jason Lindner's synth work is front and center in this snippet from the song "Big Pump," from Jason Linder Gives You Now Vs. Now (Anzic, 2009).

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Slo-Mo With Mic Wrecka: The unusual blend of hip-hop and lap steel are in evidence in this clip from "Give Me What You Got" off of the Slo-Mo with Mic Wrecka CD of the same name (Authentic Records 2009).

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Rooftops: Check out the cool riffs and hypnotic playing of the band Rooftops, in this excerpt from the song "Astray Life," from A Forest of Polarity (Clickpop, 2009).

p 18 | Junk Culture Pro/File

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Web Clip 1: Here's the title track from Junk Culture's EP, West Coast.

p 20 | Bobby Birdman Pro/File

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Web Clip 1: Birdman isn't afraid to mix stylistic elements, as evidenced by the rap-like fuzz bass in "Dust Design."

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Web Clip 2: Birdman's drum kit samples in "Victory at Sea" are an example of his penchant for building and layering unusual loops.

p40 | Creative Compression

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Web Clip 1a: This is a drum track from the upcoming Lapko LP. In its natural state, the track sounds okay, but it needs to be more special for this particular section.

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Web Clip 1b: After reversing the track and compressing it heavily, I then re-reversed it back to its normal state. This created a severe pumping effect that seemed to almost gate itself rhythmically because while it was backward, the compressor reacted to the transients in reverse. Trying this with multiple sources can give you some much needed inspiration.

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Web Clip 2a: This guitar track was a main part for one song on the upcoming New London Fire LP. However, the guitar needed more excitement and “jump.”

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Web Clip 2b: Instead of simply compressing the original signal, I created an aux send and inserted a short chamber-type reverb set to be fully wet. After the reverb, I inserted the Waves SSL G-Compressor and engaged the sidechain input. I sent the original guitar track to the aux channel and to the sidechain input of the compressor. I then set the compressor to squeeze the reverb pretty hard, but because of the sidechain input, the compressor only clamped down during the highest peaks of the dry guitar track and released quickly as the original signal dies. This creates a severe pumping effect with the tail of the reverb, without mucking up the clarity of the original guitar.

p48 | Sound Design Workshop: Acting on Impulse

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Web Clip 1: This is the unprocessed impulse that is the starting point for all of the other clips.

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Web Clip 2: Here the impulse is passed through a ping-pong delay with a delay time of 8.8 ms and 95-percent feedback.

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Web Clip 3: Here the impulse is processed through a phaser.

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Web Clip 4: Here the impulse is processed through a phaser followed by Ableton Live''s distortion effect, Erosion.

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Web Clip 5: This clip adds chorus to the processing in clip 4.

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Web Clip 6: This pitch-changing impulse pattern was created by manually decreasing the delay time and then increasing it to its maximum setting.

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Web Clip 7: Here clip 6 is dropped in pitch and thickened with Live's saturator.

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Web Clip 8: This is the sound of Rice Krispies being dropped into a pan.

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Web Clip 9: Here clip 8 is dropped in pitch and processed with the IK Multimedia T-RackS 3 Linear Phase EQ plug-in.

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Web Clip 10: Here clip 8 is dropped even more in pitch and processed more severely with the Linear Phase EQ.

p52 | Image Line FL Studio 9 Review

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Web Clip 1: This little groove uses the new Vocodex vocoder plug-in effect to imprint a drum beat on a Sytrus string pad. The spoken phrase comes from FL Studio''s Speech Synthesizer. I can''t quite decide whether the feeling of this clip is cheerful or ominous, and that''s probably a good thing.

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Web Clip A: Though it gets rather tiresome if you listen to it over and over, as I did while creating it, this 32-bar sketch demonstrates a variety of things you can do with the Gross Beat plug-in. Two Gross Beat instances are used, one on the Autogun riff and the other on the drum groove. (The bass is unprocessed.) Just to be clear: The MIDI data creating the drum and Autogun patterns heard in the first two bars is repeated without variation throughout; all changes are created by switching Gross Beat presets on the fly.

p56 | Waves CLA Classic Compressors Review

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Web Clip 1: A ''62 Strat is processed with the Waves CLA-3A compressor plug-in.

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Web Clip 2: The same four bars of room-miked drums are played twice with no break. The first four bars have no dynamics processing added. The second four bars are processed with Waves CLA-76 in Bluey mode and with all buttons in.

p60 | Sony Creative Software Sound Forge Pro 10 Review

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Web Clip 1: In this example, I''m using zplane élastique Pro to stretch a drum loop to twice its original length. First you''ll hear the original sample, then stretched to 200 percent using the Pro mode (with transient preservation), then to 200 percent with the Efficient mode (without transient preservation).

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Web Clip 2: In this example, a Chinese pitched instrument is stretched to three times its length. First you''ll hear the original, then stretched to 300 percent using the Pro mode, then to 300 percent with the Efficient mode.

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Web Clip 3: This example uses the new resonant filter. First you''ll hear a sound-effect sample in its original version, then processed with the filter''s Slicing Vocals preset, then with the Ear Sugar preset.

p62 | Heavyocity Evolve Mutations Quick Pick Review

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Web Clip 1: Rhythmic loops dovetail so well that practically any combination of keys works. Additionally, rhythmic displacement of keystrokes provides nearly infinite variety.

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Web Clip 2: Here''s a brief sampling of stings that run the gamut from tonal to inharmonic.

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Web Clip 3: Dangerous Harmonics has lovely guitar chimes and appends a rhythmic tail. Adding Modulation causes the tail to be more emphatic.

p64 | Roland AX-Synth Quick Pick Review

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Web Clip 1: This classic grand piano patch has a touch of reverb. Notice the effect that velocity has on the piano''s timbre.

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Web Clip 2: In this example of the SuperNatural sound engine''s Violin patch, I''m using pitch bend to control glissando and the modulation bar to simulate the bow''s pressure on the strings.

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Web Clip 3: Here I''m using keyboard velocity to trigger different layers of the Jazz Scat patch, producing sounds that range from simple oohs and ahhs to vocal falls.

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Web Clip 4: Here''s a classic Minimoog-type solo with portamento and delay.

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Web Clip 5: To emulate an electric guitar with distortion and harmonic resonance, I''ve enable Bender mode, which allows me to bend one note up while sustaining another.

p66 | Synthology Ivory Upright Pianos Quick Pick Review

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Web Clip 1: Barroom Upright—the rollicking sounds of the early 20th century can be heard within this old-time saloon piano.

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Web Clip 2: Vintage Upright—how about some smoky jazz in a late-night dive? The Vintage Upright piano can get you there.

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Web Clip 3: Modern Upright—this clean, neutral modern upright piano is appropriate for ballads and general-purpose playing.

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Web Clip 4: Tack Piano—this fascinating virtual instrument sounds quite reminiscent of a harpsichord.

p68 | Shure X2u Quick Pick Review

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Web Clip 1: Both the acoustic guitar and resonator guitar in this example were recorded with a Røde NT5 mic through the X2u at 16-bit/44.1kHz.