Web Clips for October 2008 - EMusician

Web Clips for October 2008

From Electronic Musician: Hear Web Clips, audio clips, audio examples, PDFs, and other downloads outlined in the October 2008 issue of the magazine.
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p16 | Download of the Month

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Web Clip 1: This clip uses Fazortan's Offset control for LFO 1 to vary the sweeping of the notch filters. The Stereo Phase control is set to 180 degrees to widen the image of this mono guitar track from the Big Fish Audio sample CD Freaky Jazzy Funky 2 (bigfishaudio.com).

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Web Clip 2: In this clip, percussion and synth tracks from Sample Magic Minimal & Tech House sample CD (bigfishaudio.com) are processed with subtle phasing to add depth and help them stand out in a mix.

p28 | Better Tone Through Reamping

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Web Clip 1: DI-recorded guitar track. The guitar is being played by Peter Kowalczyk from the band Va'amp. The reamped version (which follows right after) features the same part through a Millennia Media TD-1 reamping device and then a Fender Twin, miked with a Heil Sound PR30 through a Universal Audio 610 preamp. The engineer was Eli Crews.

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Web Clip 2: In this clip, you hear a DI-recorded bass part played by Matt Small. Next, you hear the reamped version, which went through a Little Labs IBP through an Acoustic Images head and two custom cabinets, miked with a Heil Sound PR40 through a Universal Audio 6176. The engineer was John Finkbeiner. (Web Clips 1 and 2 courtesy Eli Crews.)

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Web Clip 3 features a Fender Rhodes sample triggered from Digidesign's Structure sampler. Following after is the same example, reamped through a Radial Pro RMP into a '60s Gibson Explorer GA-18 tube amp into a Jensen 10-inch speaker, and miked with a Shure SM57. Steve Skinner engineered.

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Web Clip 4 starts with a DI-recorded synth sound from Digidesign's Hybrid. The reamped version was recorded with the same reamping signal chain as WC3. Steve Skinner engineered. (Web Clips 3 and 4 courtesy Steve Skinner.)

p40 | Electric Engineering | Steve Albini

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Web Clip 1: Steve Albini takes Rich Wells on the (literally) 2-minute tour through the main rooms at Electrical Audio, in Chicago, Illinois.

p50 | Going With the Grain

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Web Clip 1: In this example, you''ll hear an unprocessed six-second vocal sample, then a version using GrainMill to time-stretch it to four times its length. The Grain Size in the processed section changes over time from 25 ms at the beginning to 2000 ms at the end.

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Web Clip 2: This example illustrates several of REplayPLAYer''s Grain Density presets. First you''ll hear the original source sample, the sample processed with Granular_Lo, Granular_Hi, Shuffle, then Random. The program randomly picks portions of the same to play, so you''re hearing different regions with each preset.

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Web Clip 3: This example is an illustration of crusherX''s Morph parameter. The morph time is set to 30 seconds, and the change taking place is a gradual change from a spline function to a rectangular function (and back again) controlling Vapor Modulation.

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Web Clip 4: In this example, the distribution curve in Stochos is changing as the program generates grains. For about the last 20 seconds of the example, the number of different durations for each grains is being changed in real time. The original sample file is heard at the very beginning.

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Web Clip 5: In this example, Granulator''s Grain Density and Grain Duration parameters are both under the control of changing MIDI controller input. You can hear the original sample at the beginning of the example.

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Web Clip 6: In this example from Atomic Cloud, you''ll hear a vocal sample unprocessed, then a backwards-sounding version, a second version with multiple overlapping grains (in which the Scan Rate is slowing down until it freezes on a single sample), then a third version with an extremely low Grain Size.

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Web Clip 7: This example uses four different built-in waveforms from Organik''s Wave list. In the last example, the amount of pitch randomness decreases during the last 20 seconds. Note that only one Generator is sounding; Organik supports up to four different Generators simultaneously.

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Web Clip 8: This example uses Granular Cloud Generator''s Randomize Pitch feature. The Randomize value is being lowered as grains from a synthetic waveform are being generated.

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Web Clip 9: In this example from RTGS-X, two different samples are loaded into the Sample Buffers. First you''ll hear the default settings (played twice), then a version with the Grain Length set at 100% random (played twice), then a version with Grain Size set to 100% random (also played twice).

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Web Clip 10: This example uses the same sample for both of Kenaxis'' Granulators. First you''ll hear the original sample, then both Granulators playing while various parameters are being updated in real time.

p64 | Making Tracks: Side Order

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Web Clip 1: This Pro Tools session demonstrates the M-S matrix described in the article. To use the matrix in your session, use Import Session Data. Even though you''ll probably choose to hide the Mid, Side, Left, and Right aux tracks, you need to import them, as that''s where the actual addition and subtraction of signals occurs. Use the Mid and Side masters to adjust the stereo width or process the Mid or Side signals.

p66 | Sound Design Workshop: Caught in the Act

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Web Clip 1: This clip is 16 bars of Soniccouture Scriptorium Mobile Drums. Notice that no two bars are alike and that some bars are better than others.

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Web Clip 2: Here I've sliced Web Clip 1 into 16 one-bar clips and sequenced my favorites to produce a more coherent 16-bar track.

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Web Clip 3: Here 16 one-bar slices from Mobile Drums have been captured in 16 two-bar clips to allow for a ping-pong-delay tail at the end of each slice.

p74 | Review: Moog Music Minimoog Voyager Old School

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In this example, the mod wheel controls LFO modulation of oscillator waveshape, and keyboard Velocity modulates the filter frequency. Long release times in the amplitude envelope mimic ambience or reverb.

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This clip demonstrates the oscillators'' hard sync function, a feature that the original Minimoog lacked.

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Web Clip 3: In this example, the LFO is manually modulated and latched onto Oscillator 3 as a second LFO to create cool polyrhythms.

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Web Clip 4: In the first of eight examples of classic Minimoog sounds programmed from the included Voyager Old School Patch Book, this bass patch has Oscillators 2 and 3 tuned an octave above Oscillator 1, with Oscillator 3 slightly detuned for a chorus effect.

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Web Clip 5: Another 3-oscillator bass patch relies on the Filter section''s Spacing control to produce a phasing effect.

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Web Clip 6: This patch achieves a classic electric bass sound by syncing Oscillators 1 and 2 and then modulating Oscillator 2 with a signal from Oscillator 3. Adjusting Oscillator 3''s Wave knob varies the tone and fullness of the low frequencies.

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Web Clip 7: In this example, I''ve tuned the second and third oscillators an octave higher than the first and added a generous amount of glide.

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Web Clip 8: This classic single-oscillator lead sound is loosely based on the patch-book program Chick''s Oboe.

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Web Clip 9: Here I''ve tuned all three oscillators in unison and then shifted one oscillator at a time up or down an octave using its Octave knob.

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Web Clip 10: Here''s a slightly altered approach to a classic analog lead sound.

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In my final example, I''ve programmed a 2-oscillator lead patch to demonstrate continuously variable waveshape. Notice the transitions from triangle to sawtooth to pulse, first on the lower oscillator and then on the higher one.

p84 | Review: IK Multimedia ARC System

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Web Clip 1: The instruments in this clip were all recorded using the ARC System's omni microphone.

p92 | Quick Pick: Sonic Reality Ocean Way Drums Gold

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Web Clip 1: This example shows off a number of OWD's mix presets, which were created by Allen Sides. Each time this four-bar pattern repeats, you're hearing the drums through a different one of the presets, starting with Preset 1, which is close-miked and going through Presets 2, 4, 5, and 6, which have progressively more room ambience.

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Web Clip 2: The I-MAP keymap format makes programming from a keyboard controller a lot easier than with a standard GM map. This piece was programmed using I-MAP and OWD Kit 14 in the C12A configuration.