WEBCAST

Welcome to the wacky MoogWorld (www.moogworld.com), your all-Moog, all-the-time Internet radio station. When Bob Moog began marketing his synthesizers
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Welcome to the wacky MoogWorld (www.moogworld.com), your all-Moog, all-the-time Internet radio station. When Bob Moog began marketing his synthesizers in the 1960s, their novel sound spawned a genre of electronic music. Undoubtedly, the most popular album then was Wendy (then Walter) Carlos's Switched on Bach, a collection of fugues, inventions, and other works arranged for Moog synthesizer. But many other people have used the Moog's characteristic sound to produce music in a variety of popular styles.

MoogWorld has quite a collection of those songs and broadcasts them as an Internet audio stream. The Webcast is brought to you by CaveRadio (www.caveradio.com), an alternative music station with an entertaining philosophy. It, in turn, is part of the gigantic Live365 streaming site (www.live365.com), which hosts hundreds of stations (and inserts short self-promotion spots into the broadcasts). Web surfers can use WinAmp, MacAmp, or the site's Player365 application to gain access to the playlists.

The MoogWorld stream consists of tracks from The Moog Cookbook's Ye Olde Space Bande (with covers of “Born to Be Wild,” “Hotel California,” and “More Than a Feeling”) and the album Best of Moog: Electronic Pop Hits from the '60s and '70s (including “Popcorn,” “The Look of Love” and the theme from Midnight Cowboy), among others. The performances include straight-ahead rock songs with Moog solos, completely synthesized orchestrations, and the just plain electronically weird. All are interesting in one way or another, and many arrangements give new depth and meaning to the word cheesy.

Some of the tracks have been recorded to computer disk and converted to MP3 from the original vinyl. For example, Electronic Moog Orchestra's covers of Star Wars tracks retain the skips, pops, and scratches of the originals. MoogWorld also contains links to Moog-related Web sites such as Moog Archives (www.moogarchives.com) and Synthmuseum.com.