Adventures in DIY #20

Three new projects on David Battino's audio workbench
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Here are three new techniques I discovered while hacking electronic music gear. See tinyurl.com/diysnap1 for the first article in this series and many more DIY projects.

1. Stand up for DIY. My garage workbench doesn’t have a place to sit, so I made this stand to raise projects to a comfortable height. It’s built from an old cutting board with 2x2-inch legs attached with deck screws and glue. The “juice groove” keeps round objects like my flux pen from rolling away. A powerful magnet at the back corner (salvaged from an old hard drive) collects screws.

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

2. Power to Go. The small black box holds a DROK voltage booster board, which converts the 5 volts from a USB battery pack to 9V to run my Korg Kaossilator Pro. The “periscope” is an alternative plug tip for powering guitar pedals; a rubber grommet holds it in place until I’m ready to attach it to the coiled cord. A magnet glued inside the right side of the box holds the tiny screwdriver I use to adjust the output voltage.

Fig. 2

Fig. 2

3. Be Like Mic. Physical modeling apps like Beep Street Impaktor ($4.99) transform incoming audio into percussion sounds that rival the Korg Wavedrum’s. Typically you’d feed Impaktor from the iPad’s built-in mic, but substituting a guitar interface like this Peavey AmpKit LiNK lets you use electronic instruments for even more sonic possibilities.

Fig. 3

Fig. 3