FORUM FEED - EMusician

FORUM FEED

The CD format is showing its age, and the record industry was hoping you’d adopt DVD-A or SACD. But so far, neither has been a success. Surveying sage sonicists at our Sound, Studio, and Stage forum we asked POINT BLANK:Are DVD-A and SACD, DOA?
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(1) DVD-A will ultimately prevail and likely replace the CD: 8%

(2) DVD-A will have a niche market, but probably won’t replace the CD: 6%

(3) SACD will ultimately prevail and likely replace the CD: 0%

(4) SACD will have a niche market, but probably won’t replace the CD: 0%

(5) Both DVD-A and SACD will have niche markets, but probably won’t replace the CD: 24%

(6) Neither DVD-A nor SACD will succeed, primarily because the industry couldn’t decide on a format: 8%

(7) Neither DVD-A nor SACD will succeed, primarily because the public doesn’t really feel the need for a new format: 54%

BUT, BUT, BUT…

“I have DVD-A and love it. I have not bought CDs in years, yet I buy DVD-As all the time. Marketing weakness of the DVD-A producers has hindered the medium’s growth. If they were to educate the public the same way HD TV producers have, there would be increased interest.” —KB Gunn

“I don’t think most customers are looking for something ‘better’ than CDs. MP3s sound worse than CDs, but that’s probably the most significant new ‘format.’” —Phil O’Keefe

“Dual Disc (CD on one side, DVD on the other) is taking off. Sales are very promising.” —Bill Roberts

“The premise of exchanging money for little piece of plastic with data encrusted for any purpose will be as relevant 20 years from now as gas lamps are today.” —Jeff Klopmeyer

“Keep releasing CDs for those who can’t keep up, but we as an industry must move on and get into 5:1 and 24/96. There’s a new audio world out there.” —John Sayers

“The public has spoken. I don’t see SACD or DVD-A discs or players advertised, but iPods and MP3 players are flying off the shelves. History has proven that the average consumer will choose convenience over quality.” —The Soundman

“People care about listening to music, [and] even the lowly cassette is adequate to this purpose. A limited frequency response does not diminish the enjoyment of an interesting set of changes, a well-improvised solo, or an emotional vocal delivery.” —DennyF

“What people have shown is a desire for having their music available when they want it, whether streamed from a network or played from a portable device. Here, the medium is not the message.” —Doug Osborne