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Listen Hear(7) - EMusician

Listen Hear(7)

GAYLE RITT: LIFE & LOVE (Mixed & Mastered by Ed Tinley) ED TINLEY is a grand cat. His name’ll appear on everything from Liz Phair to the Smashing Pumpkins, and now? Well, Gayle Ritt’s soon-to-be-most-recent record. Which, while bearing the Tinley-mark, also manages to let Ritt frame a space for herself that’s b
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GAYLE RITT: LIFE & LOVE
(Mixed & Mastered by Ed Tinley)
ED TINLEY is a grand cat. His name’ll appear on everything from Liz Phair to the Smashing Pumpkins, and now? Well, Gayle Ritt’s soon-to-be-most-recent record. Which, while bearing the Tinley-mark, also manages to let Ritt frame a space for herself that’s beyond the usual singer-songwriter girl with a guitar schtick. Recording music that is simple and recording it simply is one of the most (more) complicated things that can be done, and both Tinley and Ritt rise to what’s sounding like a grand occasion.

KUDU: PHYSICAL WORLD
(Produced by Kudu)
Agghh!!!!! The greatest record we’ve heard this month. Bar none. One of those records where you just stop to listen and then it’s over and you’re still wondering what happened. Deantoni “D” Parks (John Cale, Lauryn Hill, DJ Logic) and Sylvia Gordon do this whole synth, wet keyboard, crazy drum thing that makes you think of MIA, ESG, and a bunch of other letters that spell out that we’re presently tracking them down to make them explain the voodoo that they do.

PLAYERS CLUB: COEXTINCTION
(Produced by Joel Hamilton, Players Club)
Sure. Call it by its real name. Cronyism. Nepotism. Blackmail. Whatever. Sure, Hamilton writes for us, but even more than that every time the Players Club comes up on the endless iTunes rondele of the favorite songs of your entire life, we sit up every time this stuff comes on. Hamilton’s ethos, built largely on the idea that he wants the music in your head to be as disturbing as the music in his head, is achieved here to great effect. Don’t know if it’s like his stuff on the UNSANE record (with no EQ anywhere on the whole damned record), and can’t tell by listening to it, but this is a mighty piece of work that puts the money where the mouth is from a production perspective. Fo’ sho.

BILLY IDOL: DEVIL'S PLAYGROUND
(Produced by Keith Forsey, Mixed by Bill Reeves)
Plays almost like a best of Idol touching off in the late ’70s, staying in the ’80s just long enough, a quick moment in the ’90s (thank god!), and just smattering of the “nu” millennium. The production is very good overall with Billy’s voice sitting right next to your face where he is most comfortable, and Steve Stevens is back! The guitar is big and cuts like a razor. Remember when rock guitar was up front? Thankfully, so do these guys. The drums for the most part are solid although the snare sound was a little wimpy for my taste. The only downside for me was the somewhat baffling lack of bottom end. But Billy Idol has delivered a surprisingly kick ass CD that I will be listening to all weekend by the pool . . . piss off! 3 out of 5 rock Ons!