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Faces of Music: 25 Years of Lunching With Legends The phone rings. “Hi. You may not know me but they call me Mr. Bonzai.” As in the miniature tree? Or as in the battle cry of the Asian wing of the Axis powers? “Yeah yeah, look, I got a book. . . .” And so it went. The famous Mr. Bonzai talking at me like Charlie
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Faces of Music: 25 Years of Lunching With Legends

The phone rings. “Hi. You may not know me but they call me Mr. Bonzai.” As in the miniature tree? Or as in the battle cry of the Asian wing of the Axis powers? “Yeah yeah, look, I got a book. . . .” And so it went. The famous Mr. Bonzai talking at me like Charlie Rose zapped out on valium. He had a book. Faces of Music. His interviews. It was great. I should read it, live it, love it. The phone went rocking back in the cradle as soon as the conversation crawled to a close and was forgotten in its entirety until the book actually showed up. Make that THE BOOK.

It’s a monster of a tome and it reads like Bonzai sounds and the questions are a curious mix— equal parts clunky, awe-inspired, and having you run the razor’s edge of laughing both at and with— of something that will have you feverishly thumbing through the whole thing just to find out what happens next.

Making this?

You got it: an unqualified work of mad genius.
—Eugene Robinson

Power Tools for Reason 3.0

There are three main target audiences for this book:

  • Reason newbies who want to be awed by what the program can do.
  • Reason experts who want to be surprised by all the things they haven’t discovered yet.
  • Those teaching college-level courses on how to write third party books about music software, and need a book they can use as an ideal example of the genre.

There are lots of books about Reason 3.0, many of which are basically rewrites of the manual — which seems like a somewhat pointless exercise, as Reason already has an excellent manual. So, Power Tools goes where the manual doesn’t go by revealing a host of extremely creative applications that exploit some of Reason’s least-understood features. Many of the techniques rely on clever patching; for those who weren’t raised on modular synthesis, this alone is worth the price of the book for showing the power of the patch cord.

But even ReDrum (about as obvious a module as you’ll find) gets some surprising expert tips, and the sections on exploiting Reason’s signal processors are masterful. The book also folds in a ton of shortcuts and time-savers, describes how to add your own “skins” to the Combinator patches, provides a concise course on mastering, and much more. The end result is a book that doesn’t just teach, but enlightens.
—Craig Anderton