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LOVE LETTERS FROM FIGHT FANS(6) - EMusician

LOVE LETTERS FROM FIGHT FANS(6)

THE SORROWS OF YOUNG WERTHER Hello. My name is Whit Aldridge. First and foremost I would like to congratulate the EQ staff for publishing the best magazine in the world! I am a huge fan, however, I am currently enrolled at the Art Institute of Atlanta in the Audio Production and Engineering degree program. While fu
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THE SORROWS OF YOUNG WERTHER
Hello. My name is Whit Aldridge. First and foremost I would like to congratulate the EQ staff for publishing the best magazine in the world! I am a huge fan, however, I am currently enrolled at the Art Institute of Atlanta in the Audio Production and Engineering degree program. While furthering my knowledge of the arts of recording and every other aspect of the industry, my wallet is being sucked bone dry. I would really like to keep reading your gift to the world but the cover price is just a bit too much for my monthly expenses. I am inquiring about a student subscription or maybe a couple of compensated issues. I hate to ask but I want to “be in the know” with all of you guys. If there are any possibilities that you know of please let me know.

Sincerely,
Whit D. Aldridge
Marietta, Georgia

You know, you seem like a plenty smart guy, it’s almost amazing to us that you missed that if you SUBSCRIBE to EQ you save huge bundles of jack. So go to eqmag.com or use one of those blow-in cards that litter your apartment floor, jack. You won’t be sorry you did. —Editor

MY EYES!!! MY EYES!!!!
By large studio standards, I’m a really small operator! I have been recording live concerts, primarily acoustic, orchestras, choruses, bands, church groups, for about 40 years in the Baltimore/Washington area. As you are probably aware, almost no studios are willing to make remote recordings that are usually 2-track and everything is live. Consequently, there’s almost no competition in this market segment, except, of course, those folks with a DAT and two mics who think then can do it themselves. Since I use Neumanns 414s, Millenia Media, Lucid, VLZ-Pro, 1176’s, Lexicon, etc., and a high level DAW, this isn’t really competition once I get in the door. My final product is CDs (used to be LPs, then cassettes) and I’ve done almost too many to count.

I’m also a full-time computer center director at a large community college.

And I’ve been reading EQ for many years but your latest change to format by including those blue printed paragraphs in a different font style than the rest of the article is really annoying! It makes the article hard to read. The change in font size and style destroys any flow of the article and the thought process that the reader has underway in absorbing what the writer is saying.

GET rid OF this PROTOCOL and KEEP the font/size/style constant!

Regards,
Wally Knapp
Ellicott City, Maryland

You got it, chief. —Editor

YOU IDIOT GENIUSES
I spent most of last night poring through back issues of EQ and thought I’d write you.

First off, BT is probably one of the best interviews ever. It’s like he’s forever on coke, except it’s not the coke that turns you into a complete a-hole. It’s magic coke that allows him to empty his superhuman brain in the most accessible way, thereby allowing him to come off as personable, knowledgeable, and very cool.

The biggest thing I noticed though is the lack of standard magazine consistency. At first this annoyed me. I wanted my regular sections. I wanted my traditional one-pagers and recurring themes. Then I realized something. Yes, you have a few regular items: Room With a VU, the sessions bit in the front of the book, etc. But for the most part, you seem to fill your pages with content, rather than fill your pages with thematic placeholders . . . then try to squeeze in content that fits. This creates a kind of editorial spontaneity that’s very, very refreshing. It makes you scan every page for fear of missing out on something you didn’t know was there to begin with. Too often I find myself passing over chunks of my favorite magazines because, for some reason or another, I’ve fallen out of lust with my “sections.” Not in this case. Oh, and any magazine that has Dean Kuipers writing for them is automatically rope-a-dope.

This isn’t a ‘round-the-back pitch for freelance work. (I’m still not enough of a tech head to review gear and gadgets.) Just wanted to email a “good on ya” for breaking the mold by doing away with the mold altogether.

Have a good one.
Richard Thomas (by email)