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Don’t you just love it when people divulge their secrets? Here are some cable labeling tricks from MusicPlayer.com Original question posted by Wiggum: Like most home studios, I have cables running everywhere. I keep them well segregated and fairly neat, but I don’t have any identifiers on the cables. I’d like t
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Don’t you just love it when people divulge their secrets? Here are some cable labeling tricks fromMusicPlayer.com

Original question posted by Wiggum: Like most home studios, I have cables running everywhere. I keep them well segregated and fairly neat, but I don’t have any identifiers on the cables. I’d like to color-code them, but I’ve never found a reliable way to do so. I’ve tried colored tape and pinstripe tape, but the adhesive seldom lasts. Velcro might work, but the colored packs don’t offer that many colors. I also thought about short sections of heat shrink tubing, but I don’t think I could get it past my Neutrik connectors, and I don’t want to damage my cables during the heating process. I also thought about a paint pen.

Zeronyne: This place has nine different colors:www.textol.com . The Unitag: www.fastenation.com

Rim: I use letters of the alphabet instead of colors, which gives you 26 cables you can label. If that’s not enough, I guess you can start using the Greek alphabet, too.

I have access to a labelmaker, a Brother P-Touch. I type the letter enough times so when I wrap it around a cable, you can see the letter at any angle. So far, those labels have remained stuck on, but if you want to make doubly sure, you can wrap Scotch tape around the label.

where02190: We use the following: 3/4" PVC tape, color-coding. Brother P-Touch label on top of tape, usually black (or white if black tape) on clear background. Heatshrink over this, extending 1/4" past the edges. For some large connectors you’ll need to remove one end.

Rob Campbell: Go to an electrical supply store and pick up cloth cable markers. They have long-lasting adhesive. They have numbers and letters. They are about 1-1/2" long by 1/4" wide and have the letters/numbers printed all the way around so you can see them from any angle.

Djwayne: I use cheap color-coded tape, 3/8" wide. Red for recording input, blue for output, various colors for sound cards and channels, then 1, 2, or 3 pieces of 1/4" duct tape to number the cable. For a while I used white tape and a magic marker, but the tape would get crumpled up or the lettering smeared and hard to read. Color-coding works best for me.

Billster: I use medical cloth tape, and write exactly what the connection is, like “gate 1 out” or “Board in 16” on each end of the cable.

Bpark: I build my own, and heat shrink over the labels, so they stay. Radio Shack had a yellow wire tie-like device, with a paddle on the end with a writing surface. Nice part about them was that you could use soft pencil, and if you changed your mind, you could erase it with a soft eraser and change it. Also, you could just cut them off and put a new one on should you want to do so.